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Newsletter #17 - The Church of Spiritual Humanism

January 29, 2004 - Philadelphia www.SpiritualHumanism.org


The most important thing we each could do to make the world a better place is to promote happiness and contentment. We are all entitled to these things as long as our actions do not infringe upon the rights of others. Humans are highly social creatures and often our state of well-being is dependent upon the acts of others. We can make an extra effort to help others reach their goals so that they might be content and encourage them to do the same. You can make the difference that can eventually lead to your own contentment and that of many others.


U.S. doesn't lead world in happiness
By David Yount - Associated Press

WISHING OURSELVES a Happy New Year should be automatic. After all, the United States is the only nation that claims happiness to be its citizens' right. Alas, according to the World Database of Happiness, we barely make it into the top 10 of the world's industrialized nations in terms of life satisfaction. Overall, the natives are happier in Iceland (No.1!), the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, Ireland, Belgium and Great Britain -- as well as down under in Australia. The problem is that, much as we seek it, happiness can't be purchased, and it doesn't just happen. Enter the scientific community, which has decided to explore the ingredients of joy. Britain's venerable Royal Society recently sponsored a two-day conference to explore the "science of well-being."

see full story at



In the end everyone is responsible for their own happiness. If you are not as satisfied with life as you would like, you must make the effort and learn the skills to meet your personal goals. We live in a society that could be happier. Through volunteering and community service we can help others who in turn will pass along their good fortune. Quick and easy solutions don't work, and sometimes goals must be changed to be more realistic. But happiness is possible and worth it.


If you have a question feel free to email me at info ( at ) spiritual humanism.org
Phil writes:
Could an inmate of the Department of Corrections be ordained? I'm asking on behalf of my stepson. He doesn't know I'm asking you so send your reply to me. He found religion and spirituality before he was convicted. We are appealing his case because I believe he is innocent and will be out soon. - Phil


In general we will ordain without weighing a person's past history of trouble with the law. There are exceptions and, of course, we reserve the right not to ordain all applicants. It's possible for guilty people to change and everyone should have the opportunity to become a better person. However if a person is already ordained and then commits or is convicted of a crime they will most likely be expelled from the clergy.


Yes Clergy Packages are available in our online store. The Ordination Certificates are printed on acid free paper for extra long life, and Clergy Wallet ID Cards are nice to have. The Officiant's Manual includes information on celebrating the solstices, sample ceremonies, etc., and the companion CD has marriage laws for all 50 states. The fees charged for these packs are our only income and help defer the cost of the web site, advertising, PO Box, and fund the purchase of a permanent location for our regular religious services.

RA Zorger
President, The Church of Spiritual Humanism

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